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July 25, 2019 Thursday 02:44:44 PM IST

Low Carb Mediterranean Diet Helpful in Reducing Fat

Photo by Michal Jarmoluk for Pixabay

A new study by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has found that low car Mediterranean diet has a great effect on reducing fat in the liver, around the heart and in the pancreas compared to similar low-fat diet with lower calorie counts.The participants in the experiment who were on a low-carb Mediterranean diet reported moderate weight loss, 30% loss of liver fat, 11% fall in fat around the heart and visceral fat (stomach region) was down by 25%.
The researchers used MRI for scanning the body fat before and after the experiment.While fat accumulates in the abdomen region, the percentage of fat in the liver also rises for most obese people. The impact of this build up is still a matter of debate (the classic 'chicken-and-the-egg' dilemma: There is still no agreement whether "fatty liver disease" is a disease outright, and many experts believe that without further changes to the liver, like development of infections and/or fibrosis (development of proteins outside cells), there is no significant health risk). Therefore, there are currently no treatments specifically intended to treat fatty liver, other than general advice to lose weight. 
Despite similar levels of weight loss, subjects who maintained a Mediterranean diet fared better than those who maintained a low-fat diet according to several indices used to measure risk for heart disease and diabetes. According to three indices used to measure a patient's likelihood to develop heart trouble over the coming 10 years – indices factoring a range of various parameters, including gender and age of the participant, fat and sugar levels in the blood and blood pressure –more significant reductions in the risk of heart disease were found for the participants who followed Mediterranean diets.  

Source:https://in.bgu.ac.il/en/pages/news/mri_fat.aspx



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