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March 10, 2020 Tuesday 11:51:54 AM IST

Young teachers happier but say hard work is unrewarded

Teacher Insights

According to new University of London (UCL) research, newly qualified teachers report higher levels of wellbeing and life satisfaction compared to other graduates, but are more likely to say hard work is unrewarded. The study also shows that newly qualified teachers work, on average, nine hours more a week compared to graduates in other professions.

Researchers from the UCL Institute of Education analysed data of around 16,000 people born in 1989-90 from the Next Steps cohort study. The study began in 2004 and has continued to track individuals into their twenties. By age 26 the final sample of teachers who had been in the job for up to three years was 291.

Teachers were asked questions about their wellbeing, health, working and social lives as well as whether they believed that hard work in Britain is rewarded. Overall, teachers reported higher levels of life satisfaction and showed no evidence of worse mental health or less active social lives, when compared to others in the cohort. For example, 37% of teachers said they were ‘very satisfied’ at ages 20 and 26, whereas 34% cent of those in office jobs (for example) said they were ‘very satisfied’ at age 20 compared to 25% at age 26. 

Teachers were however less likely than their peers to believe that Britain is a place where hard work gets rewarded. Around 30% of teachers agreed or strongly agreed that hard work is rewarded, compared to around 40% of health workers and lower-managerial workers and 45% of all graduates and over half of all office workers.


The findings also showed that compared to all graduates, teachers are paid around £22 more per week. However, teachers received £54 per week less than their peers working in health and £71 less than those in office jobs.


(Content Courtesy: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2020/mar/young-teachers-happier-say-hard-work-unrewarded)


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