Technology Inceptions: HP ProBook 445 G6 Business Laptop launched  |  Rajagiri Round Table: 51st Rajagiri Round Table:Listening Skills Should Become Part of Curriculum  |  National Edu News: India Launches NISHTHA, the largest Teachers' Training Programme in the World  |  Technology Inceptions: Black Shark to launch new phones  |  Science Innovations: Designer algae to produce fuels   |  Parent Interventions: For a stronger father-child relationship  |  Parent Interventions: Vitamin D Deficiency in Middle Childhood Can Cause Aggressive Behavior  |  Technology Inceptions: Flipkart revamps seller onboarding process  |  Technology Inceptions: New range of Nokia Mesh Wi-Fi Router  |  Teacher Insights: Vacation to reduce cardiovascular diseases  |  Science Innovations: Chemo drug with fewer side effects  |  National Edu News: Kala Utsav 2019 Guidelines Released by MHRD  |  Education Information: Chandrayaan-2 Precisely Inserted in Defined Orbit  |  Health Monitor: Fascination for Slimness Has Racial Origins, Not Linked to Health  |  Parent Interventions: Online Brain Games Help in Multi-Tasking at Old Age   |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

November 22, 2018 Thursday 04:24:41 PM IST

You can melt gold at room temperature!

Science Innovations

Researchers were examining a small piece of gold under electron microscope, which operates at very high electric fields. They found that the surface layers of gold had actually melted -- at room temperature! The results are now published in the journal Physical Review Materials.

"I was really stunned by the discovery. This is an extraordinary phenomenon, and it gives us new, foundational knowledge of gold," says Ludvig de Knoop, the researcher and physicist.

What happened was that the gold atoms became excited. Under the influence of the electric field, they suddenly lost their ordered structure and released almost all their connections to each other. Upon further experimentation, the researchers discovered that it was also possible to switch between a solid and a molten structure in reversible cycles. This is not just spectacular, but also groundbreaking scientifically!

The researchers suggest that this phenomenon is related to the so-called low-dimensional phase transition related to the field of topology in which David Thouless, Duncan Haldane and Michael Kosterlitz received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2016.


Anyway, the ability to melt surface layers of gold in this manner enables various novel practical applications in the future. The technology could be used in the development of different types of sensors, catalysts and transistors.

Source: DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.2.085006


Comments