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August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Writing with a Rhythm

Parent Interventions

A study published in the journal Developmental  Psychobiology concludes that development of writing skills in Japanese first-grade students learning the hiragana script depends on the mastery of rhythm by the children. By quantifying pen movements of children, researchers revealed the process of learning distinct temporal patterns of movement in such a way to differentiate a set of subtle features of each symbol.


 It was understood that acquisition of writing skills during childhood is a combination of two processes: the acquisition of visual representations and the development of fine motor skills to produce the desired trajectory of the pen. The current study underlines the importance of rhythm in learning to write.


The study also suggests that the process of learning to write may be linked to a phenomenon specific to  Chinese character-based cultures known as “air writing”, when people unconsciously move their fingers while trying to recall a certain character.


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