Parent Interventions: GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children  |  Parent Interventions: Research Finds Women Often Overprescribed Opioids After Childbirth  |  Parent Interventions: Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for premature babies  |  National Edu News: Capturing the voice of the unreached in S&T policy formulation  |  Leadership Instincts: British and Indian experts join forces to battle 'superbugs'   |  Parent Interventions: Coronavirus-related children's diseases linked to blood cell changes  |  International Edu News: Being Human Festival returns  |  International Edu News: Warwick Hosts another year of the Data Science for Social Good programme   |  Science Innovations: Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D  |  International Edu News: Bristol students launch international charity scheme  |  International Edu News: Happier people are more likely to comply with lockdown restrictions  |  Leadership Instincts: The University of Manchester launches its Innovation Factory  |  International Edu News: UCL launches new Centre on US Politics  |  Education Information: Student Entrepreneurship Programme 2.0  |  Education Information: Digital transformation opportunities emerged from COVID 19 disruptions  |  
August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Writing with a Rhythm

Parent Interventions

A study published in the journal Developmental  Psychobiology concludes that development of writing skills in Japanese first-grade students learning the hiragana script depends on the mastery of rhythm by the children. By quantifying pen movements of children, researchers revealed the process of learning distinct temporal patterns of movement in such a way to differentiate a set of subtle features of each symbol.


 It was understood that acquisition of writing skills during childhood is a combination of two processes: the acquisition of visual representations and the development of fine motor skills to produce the desired trajectory of the pen. The current study underlines the importance of rhythm in learning to write.


The study also suggests that the process of learning to write may be linked to a phenomenon specific to  Chinese character-based cultures known as “air writing”, when people unconsciously move their fingers while trying to recall a certain character.


Comments