Teacher Insights: Bullying bosses worsen safety  |  Science Innovations: Neural strategy to combat stress  |  Technology Inceptions: Snap Spectacles for 3D images   |  Parent Interventions: Middle school stress-busters  |  Technology Inceptions: IBM to Provide Training in Basic Artificial Intelligence for Trainers  |  National Edu News: Margadarshan, Margadarshaks Mentoring Scheme for Institutions Launched  |  Technology Inceptions: Apple iPhone battery lockdown for safety  |  International Edu News: Teramo varsity to waive fee for Africans  |  National Edu News: Meet on future of water  |  Technology Inceptions: WhatsApp fingerprint lock for Android  |  Finance: Digitisation: Learning from Singapore  |  Teacher Insights: National Teachers Award 2018 Winners and How They Achieved it  |  Technology Inceptions: Researchers Develop Metamaterial Morphs That Can Take New Shapes  |  Teacher Insights: Brain stimulation modifies memory   |  Teacher Insights: Babies display empathy for victims  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

August 01, 2017 Tuesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Writing with a Rhythm

Parent Interventions

A study published in the journal Developmental  Psychobiology concludes that development of writing skills in Japanese first-grade students learning the hiragana script depends on the mastery of rhythm by the children. By quantifying pen movements of children, researchers revealed the process of learning distinct temporal patterns of movement in such a way to differentiate a set of subtle features of each symbol.


 It was understood that acquisition of writing skills during childhood is a combination of two processes: the acquisition of visual representations and the development of fine motor skills to produce the desired trajectory of the pen. The current study underlines the importance of rhythm in learning to write.


The study also suggests that the process of learning to write may be linked to a phenomenon specific to  Chinese character-based cultures known as “air writing”, when people unconsciously move their fingers while trying to recall a certain character.


Comments