Parent Interventions: As a Studious Girl Destroyed Her Mobile Phone  |  Teacher Insights: Know about how to choose the best MPPSC coaching institute  |  National Edu News: Swinburne University of Technology & IIT H launch the joint doctoral program  |  Policy Indications: India & Japan collaborations for innovations on Hydrogen based technologies  |  National Edu News: Education Minister addresses at the Annual Convocation of IIM Rohtak  |  Education Information: UPSC postpones tests and Interviews of some examinations  |  National Edu News: Piyush Goyal launches the Startup India Seed Fund Scheme  |  Teacher Insights: Are you Proficient in English?  |  National Edu News: National climate vulnerability assessment sees 8 states as highly vulnerable  |  National Edu News: Education minister e-launches long-lasting hygiene product DuroKea Series  |  National Edu News: Punjab’s new nutrient rich crop varieties can satisfy India's nutritional needs   |  Guest Column: Delicious Dhabas  |  International Edu News: 2D Perovskites for Solar Cells and LEDS  |  International Edu News: AI Model for Predicting Tsunami  |  International Edu News: Wearable Sweat Sensors on a Bandage  |  
February 19, 2020 Wednesday 12:37:53 PM IST

'Worrying' levels of vaccine misinformation on social media

Policy Indications

According to a study of vaccine knowledge and media use by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, people who rely on social media for information were more likely to be misinformed about vaccines than those who rely on traditional media. The study, based on nationally representative surveys of nearly 2,500 U.S. adults, found that up to 20% of respondents were at least somewhat misinformed about vaccines. Such a high level of misinformation is "worrying" because misinformation undermines vaccination rates, and high vaccination rates are required to maintain community immunity, the researchers said.

Media consumption patterns helped to explain the change in misinformation levels, the researchers found. Those respondents who reported increased exposure to information about measles and the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine on social media were more likely to grow more misinformed about vaccines. By contrast, those people who reported increased exposure to news accounts about those topics in traditional media were more likely to grow less misinformed about vaccines.

"People who received their information from traditional media were less likely to endorse common anti-vaccination claims," said lead author Dominik Stecula, a postdoctoral fellow in the science of science communication program at the Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC). He co-authored the study with Ozan Kuru, another APPC postdoctoral fellow, and APPC Director Kathleen Hall Jamieson.

The result is consistent with research suggesting that social media contain a fair amount of misinformation about vaccination while traditional media are more likely to reflect the scientific consensus on its benefits and safety, according to the Annenberg researchers.


The researchers found that: 

18% of respondents mistakenly say that it is very or somewhat accurate to state that vaccines cause autism;

15% mistakenly agree that it is very or somewhat accurate to state that vaccines are full of toxins;

20% wrongly report that it is very or somewhat accurate to state that it makes no difference whether parents choose to delay or spread out vaccines instead of relying on the official vaccine schedule from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC);


and 19% incorrectly say it is very or somewhat accurate to state that it is better to develop immunity by getting the disease than by vaccination.

Medical experts and media consumption

The researchers also found that an individual's level of trust in medical experts affects the likelihood that a person's beliefs about vaccination will change. Low levels of trust in medical experts coincide with believing vaccine misinformation, the researchers said. In addition, the research found that vaccine misinformation proved resilient over time. Most of those in the sample (81%) were just as informed or misinformed in the spring (February/March) as they were months later, in the fall (September/October), despite the extensive news coverage of the measles outbreak and attempts by the CDC to educate the public. Among the 19% whose level of knowledge changed substantially, 64% were more misinformed and 36% were better informed.

The researchers point out that although the findings only show correlations between media coverage and individual attitudes - not causation - these findings still hold implications for the effectiveness of national pro-vaccination campaigns, the role of health professionals in addressing misinformation, and the impact of social media misinformation. The researchers said this study suggests that "increasing the sheer amount of pro-vaccination content in media of all types may be of value over the longer term." They said the findings also underscore the importance of decisions by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Pinterest to reduce or block access to anti-vaccine misinformation.


(Content Courtesy: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-02/appc-vma021420.php)


Comments