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May 15, 2019 Wednesday 02:42:22 PM IST

Word power for kids

Parent Interventions

Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to, a new study found.This ‘million word gap’ could be one key in explaining differences in vocabulary and reading development, according to Jessica Logan, lead author of anew study and Assistant Professor of Educational Studies at The Ohio State University.

Even kids who are read only one book a day will hear about 290,000 more words by age 5 than those who don't regularly read books with a parent or caregiver.The word gap of more than 1 million words between children raised in a literacy-rich environment and those who were never read to is striking,The words kids hear from books may have special importance in learning to read. Kids who hear more vocabulary are likely to pick up reading skills more quickly and easily.


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