Teacher Insights: New Harvard Online course course prepares professionals for a data-driven world  |  Parent Interventions: Research shows lullabies in any language relax babies  |  International Edu News: 'Plastic bags could be 'eco-friendlier' than paper and cotton bags'  |  Leadership Instincts: Start-up with plastic waste recycling solution wins top prize at ideasinc 2020  |  International Edu News: Frailty, old age and comorbidity main predictors of death from Covid-19  |  Leadership Instincts: Cyber centre to reduce digital harm  |  Policy Indications: New funding to improve water security for 10 million people in Africa and Asia  |  International Edu News: UCL hosts global conference on UN Sustainable Development Goals  |  International Edu News: Medium-term impact of COVID-19 revealed in new study  |  International Edu News: Extremely rapid diagnostic test for Covid-19  |  Teacher Insights: Cambridge University Press to join with Cambridge Assessment  |  National Edu News: Minister inaugurates new Diamond Jubilee Lecture Hall Complex of NIT Jamshedpur  |  Education Information: CSIR partnered clinical trials website “CUReD” on Repurposed Drugs for Covid- 19  |  Teacher Insights: The 6th India International Science Festival to be held in Virtual format  |  National Edu News: Minister virtually inaugurates golden jubilee building at NIT Tiruchirappalli  |  
July 19, 2019 Friday 02:14:34 PM IST

Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children

Parent Interventions

A new study done on 248 early career oncologists by University of Michigan showed that women were less likely than men to attend scientific meetings as they had to attend to their children at home. 
The survey showed that only a third of the men had to skip a scientific meeting because of family obligations while half of the women said child care made them skip such conferences."Amid concerns about gender inequity in advancement in medicine, it is especially important to identify innovative and visible actions that target the mechanisms fueling inequity," says study author Reshma Jagsi, M.D., D.Phil., Newman Family Professor and deputy chair of radiation oncology at Michigan Medicine and director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. 
About three-quarters of both the men and the women surveyed had young children. But while 74% of women had a spouse employed full-time, only 45% of men did. And women reported spending about 10 hours more each week than men on parenting and domestic tasks. The study is published in JAMA Oncology. 
"Our society continues to embrace a gendered division of domestic labor, whereby women bear the greater burden of responsibilities at home, even when they're highly committed to their careers. Facilitating work-life integration is essential, and this study provides concrete data to support this need," Jagsi says. 
The authors cite onsite child care and women's networking venues as essential elements to improve access for women. Nearly three times as many women as men said having child care onsite at meetings would be extremely important and would help enable them to attend.



Comments