Policy Indications: Harvard Teacher Fellows provides new teachers, local impact  |  International Edu News: Oxford's COVID-19 vaccine offers a high level of protection  |  Leadership Instincts: Harvard University CFAR announces leadership change  |  Parent Interventions: Virtual holiday toy and joy drive  |  Leadership Instincts: New Zealand PM to receive 2020 Gleitsman International Activist Award  |  International Edu News: Science and Innovation Fellowship accepting applications  |  Policy Indications: National Coalition calls for new White House-led focus on children and youth  |  Education Information: Faculty alter new first-year requirement because of continuing Covid-19  |  Leadership Instincts: Phiala Shanahan receives Kenneth G. Wilson Award  |  Leadership Instincts: Erik Demaine wins 2020 MIT Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching  |  Education Information: Second annual MIT Science Bowl Invitational takes virtual format  |  International Edu News: Meghan Davis named 2022 Mitchell Scholar  |  National Edu News: Multilateral cooperation is the key to overcoming global challenges: Minister  |  National Edu News: Tenth edition of National Science Film Festival kicks offin a virtual mode  |  Technology Inceptions: ‘WalkON Suit 4’ Releases Paraplegics from Wheelchairs​  |  
October 16, 2018 Tuesday 10:02:30 AM IST

Why do bees stop buzzing during a total solar eclipse?

Parent Interventions

On August 21, 2017, the day of total solar eclipse, bees took a break from their daily routines and stopped buzzing! This observation was made by the researchers at the University of Missouri, who organized a cadre of citizen scientists and elementary school classrooms in setting up acoustic monitoring stations to listen in on bees' buzzing--or lack thereof--as the eclipse passed over. The results of the study are published in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America.

It was already predicted that the bee activity would drop as light dimmed during the eclipse and would reach a minimum at totality. However, an abrupt change in which bees would stop completely, was something unexpected.

The project engaged more than 400 participants--including scientists, members of the public, and elementary school teachers and students--in setting up 16 monitoring stations. The recordings didn't allow for differentiation between bee species, but participant observations indicated most bees monitored were bumble bees (genus Bombus) or honey bees (Apis mellifera).

Bees commonly fly more slowly at dusk and return to their colonies at night, and so the same behavior triggered by a solar eclipse offers evidence about how they respond to environmental cues when those cues occur unexpectedly.


Source: https://doi.org/10.1093/aesa/say035

Comments