Technology Inceptions: Tesla to Start Delivering Model 3 to China Buyers in March  |  Technology Inceptions: ISRO Working on Chandrayaan-2 Launch for Next Month  |  Parent Interventions: Parents can influence kids' musical tastes  |  Parent Interventions: Discipline strategies to tackle misbehaviour  |  Science Innovations: New properties of sulphur atom   |  Science Innovations: Psychiatric diseases linked to molecular set-up  |  Cover Story: NURTURE AGRI-BUSINESS  |  Cover Story: A friend in weed Floating farms on weed islands   |  Rajagiri Round Table: Cultivate New Tech Farm Beckons Gen Next  |  Parent Interventions: Stronger Self-Regulation In Childhood to Boost Resilience  |  Parent Interventions: Youth with good relationships stand up against bullying  |  Technology Inceptions: Volvo & Skanska’s Electric Site Reduces Carbon Emissions By 98%  |  Technology Inceptions: ISRO Launches GSAT-7A Military Communications Satellite on Board GSLV-F11 Rocket  |  Cover Story: WHEN FOOD COMES CALLING  |  Cover Story: Yours Online, Kudumbashree  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

October 26, 2018 Friday 11:37:31 AM IST
Why are city dwellers more hurried and less friendly?

A new study by psychology researchers of the University of Miami suggests that humans switch off their automatic inclination to share in dealings with strangers, robbing them of their core instincts.

Humans are born generous! They try to be fair to others, as far as possible under the influence of a basic instinct. However, they can quickly unlearn that cooperative behavior when encountering strangers if they know they won't benefit from our actions, as it often happens in the anonymous life in a large city, suggests a study by researchers of the University of Miami. Their results are published in Nature Human Behavior.

According to the study, the cooperative spirit is a remnant of our evolutionary past, ingrained in human core. As humans lived in small groups, they knew every person in their social circle and they never knew who they might need to help them. Over time, they automatized the decision to be kind out of self-interest.

"We are actually walking around with Stone Age minds," said McCullough, director of the lab in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of Psychology. "Our minds still think how we treat everyone we meet could have consequences--that everyone we run across and are either mean to or nice to will somehow pay us back. We have a natural karma built into us because our minds have evolved into thinking that what goes around really does come around."

However, as humans experience anonymous interactions, such intuitive cooperation gets reduced. In such situations, the "cognitive shortcut", they have built into our brains to be generous or fair can be easily switched off, especially if they learn there won't be any payback, either positive or negative.

The results could explain why big-city dwellers have a reputation for being more hurried and less friendly to strangers than small-town folk.

Source:https://news.miami.edu/stories/2018/10/is-big-city-living-eroding-our-nice-instinct.html

Comments