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August 13, 2018 Monday 02:26:07 PM IST

WHO Recommends Whole Grain Starch

Science Innovations

According to a review published in the Journal of Dental Research, by the researchers of Newcastle University, UK, consumption of sweet and processed starch risks oral health. In order to preserve oral health, one should stick to whole grain carbohydrates, which is additionally found to lower the risk of oral cancer also offer protection against gum disease, the study recommends. The study was recommended by World Health Organization (WHO).

Researchers found no association between the total amount of starch eaten and tooth decay. But they did find that more processed forms of starch, which can be broken down into sugars in the mouth, by amylase found in saliva,increased risk of cavities and affects oral hygiene.

"The evidence suggests that a diet rich in whole grain carbohydrates is less likely to damage your oral health than one containing processed starches," says the research.

WHO has also updated the guidance on carbohydrate intake and has recommended reducing free sugar intake to less than 10 % of total energy (calorie) intake, and suggests further reduction to less than 5% for additional health benefits. Free sugars are sugars that are added to foods by the manufacturer, cook, or consumer, plus those naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates.


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