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August 06, 2018 Monday 04:08:09 PM IST

Who is more cliquey? Boys or Girls?

Teacher Insights

As per results of a new research published in PLOS ONE, the friendship among student groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands. The research was conducted by the researchers of London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in partnership with the University of Cambridge.They were conducting studies on unique features and structure of children's social networks within different schools.

A clear information regarding the social mixing pattern is, for example, required by the public health departments to be able to plan effective vaccination strategies. The key risk group for disease transmission is the most cliquey groups.

Researchers identified unique structures of contacts within a school system, which varied considerably when it came to the inter-school structures of contacts. The characteristics of social networks were found to be mainly dependent on gender and to a lesser extent on other factors, such as school class. In particular, males tended to cluster together more in each mixed-sex school in the survey.


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