National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad-NHAI sign MoU for Transportation Research  |  Cover Story: Elimination Round or Aptitude Test- How to Align CUET with NEP 2020 Goals  |  Life Inspirations: Master of a Dog House  |  Education Information: Climate Predictions: Is it all a Piffle!  |  Leadership Instincts: Raj Mashruwala Establishes CfHE Vagbhata Chair in Medical Devices at IITH   |  National Edu News: TiHAN supports a Chair for Prof Srikanth Saripalli at IIT Hyderabad  |  Teacher Insights: How To Build Competitive Mindset in Children Without Stressing Them  |  Parent Interventions: What Books Children Must Read this Summer Vacation   |  Policy Indications: CUET Mandatory for Central Universities  |  Teacher Insights: Classroom Dialogue for a Better World  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Is Time Ripe for Entrepreneurial Universities in India?  |  Life Inspirations: How to Overcome Fear of Public Speaking  |  Technology Inceptions: Smart IoT-based, indigenously-developed, ICU Ventilator “Jeevan Lite” Launched  |  Parent Interventions: Meditation Reduces Guilt Feeling  |  Teacher Insights: Music Relief for Study Stress  |  
August 06, 2018 Monday 04:08:09 PM IST

Who is more cliquey? Boys or Girls?

Teacher Insights

As per results of a new research published in PLOS ONE, the friendship among student groups in secondary school remain consistent over time and are often structured around gender, with boys forming the most tight-knit bands. The research was conducted by the researchers of London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in partnership with the University of Cambridge.They were conducting studies on unique features and structure of children's social networks within different schools.

A clear information regarding the social mixing pattern is, for example, required by the public health departments to be able to plan effective vaccination strategies. The key risk group for disease transmission is the most cliquey groups.

Researchers identified unique structures of contacts within a school system, which varied considerably when it came to the inter-school structures of contacts. The characteristics of social networks were found to be mainly dependent on gender and to a lesser extent on other factors, such as school class. In particular, males tended to cluster together more in each mixed-sex school in the survey.


Comments