Science Innovations: Brain Considers Information The Same Way as Money or Food  |  Lifestyle: Yoga for Mental, Physical Health, Peace and Happiness  |  Prizes & Awards: British Council ISA: Celebrating Internationalism in Schools  |  Science Innovations: Heart simulations on cellphone   |  National Edu News: Science film production  |  International Edu News: Singapore medical training move  |  Scholarships & Sponsorships: National Scholarships Portal- Single Point Solution for Students, Institutions  |  Education Information: World Population To be 9.7 Bn, India to be Most Populated Nation by 2050  |  Life Inspirations: How Rhodell Kpandyu of Liberia Became a Heavy Equipments Technician  |  Health Monitor: FB Posts Indicator of Mental Health and Diabetes  |  Career News: IBPS RRB 2019 Application Link Activated   |  Life Inspirations: Sushila Sable-From Waste Picker to Ambassador of Climate Change  |  Science Innovations: Killing drug-resistant bacteria  |  Technology Inceptions: Canon EOS 200D II DSLR With Dual Pixel AF  |  Teacher Insights: Exercise activates memory neural networks   |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

April 10, 2018 Tuesday 03:07:23 PM IST

When the Kid's Autistic Brain can't Calm Down

Science Innovations

One third of children who have autism spectrum disorder also have epilepsy, says study. It's related to a major autism risk gene, which is mutated in patients with autism. Though medical sciences have progressed so much, scientists didn't know why the mutation, catnap2, caused seizures.

Now Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered that the mutation acts like a bad gardener in the brain. It shrinks the neurons' tiny branches and leaves -- its dendrite arbors and synapses -- that enable brain cells to relay vital messages and control the brain's activity. The shrinkage causes a breakdown in message delivery.

And the important message that gets lost is to "Calm Down!”

In people with the mutation, inhibitory neurons don't grow enough branches and leaves to communicate their Zen-like message, the scientists found. That leads to seizures. It is the job of the inhibitory neurons to keep things tranquil in the brain and slam the brake on excitatory neurons. This leads to seizures. The paper was published April 2 in Molecular Psychiatry.


(Story Source: Journal published by Northwestern University)

Comments