Teacher Insights: Chocolate, the Right Food to Improve Your Brain Power  |  Leadership Instincts: Strong Bricks Can Be Made from Bio solids and Clay  |  Parent Interventions: Order of Birth in Family Has Influence on Intelligence  |  Cover Story: MIND THE NET  |  Technology Inceptions: Oppo’s 10X Lossless Hybrid Zoom Smartphone Camera Tech to Enter Mass Production   |  Technology Inceptions: AI Can Help Improve Understanding of Earth Science  |  Cover Story: THE CYBER BRAIN  |  Science Innovations: New treatment for osteoporosis   |  Technology Inceptions: SpaceX Protests NASA Launch Contract Award  |  Science Innovations: Cost-efficient catalysts  |  Technology Inceptions: NASA to Launch New Space Telescope in 2023 to Explore Origins of Universe  |  Leadership Instincts: Social Media Cannot Cause Depression  |  Parent Interventions: Maternal Grandmothers Can Raise Survival Rate of Grandchildren  |  Teacher Insights: Waking Up Early No Guarantee for Success  |  Teacher Insights: Ask your girl child to do science, not become scientist  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

November 13, 2018 Tuesday 11:47:45 AM IST
When ‘small changes’ better than ‘no change’ at all

An international group of researchers has established that people feel it's easier to achieve a small incremental goal than to maintain the status quo, thanks to a quirk in the way our brain evaluates goals.

Is it true that no change is easier than any change? Not always, suggests a new study published in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

"When evaluating goal difficulty, our brain first considers the gap between the starting point and the desired state. Usually, the bigger the gap, the more difficult the goal. However, if there is no gap to speak of, as in the case of a status quo goal, the brain starts scanning the context, anticipating potential reasons for failure," says Amitava Chattopadhyay, the co-author of the study.

When a status quo goal is directly compared to one that involves a modest improvement, objectivity prevails: The absence of a gap makes the status quo goal seems easier, as logic would dictate.

The study indicates how managers shall set goals such that sales quotas. They should be aware that status quo goals are less attractive than ones involving a slight increment. This may be especially true if the economy is in a downturn, as a status quo goal will precisely draw the staff's attention to the negative context and have a demoralising effect.

Source: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.obhdp.2018.09.002

Comments