Parent Interventions: Common Time-Out Mistakes  |  Parent Interventions: Raise Your Kid as an Optimist  |  Parent Interventions: Sharing Makes Preschoolers Happier  |  Parent Interventions: 10 Tips for Moms to Manage Work and Family  |  Parent Interventions: Want to Control Your Kids' Devices? Google has a Solution!  |  Policy Indications: MBBS Students 'Must Know'  |  Policy Indications: Home Minister Calls for Inclusion of Martyrs' Biographies in Syllabus  |  Teacher Insights: Add Language to the Math!  |  Policy Indications: University of Mysore Makes Admission Process Easy for Foreign Students  |  Policy Indications: Delhi University Announces Free Coaching Classes for PG Entrance Exams  |  Policy Indications: Delhi Starts 'Spoken English' Course For Government School Students  |  Education Information: 5 Ways Students Benefit From School Lockers  |  Education Information: How Important is Lighting in a Classroom?  |  Education Information: FSSAI Regulations for Canteen Employees  |  Education Information: The Importance of First Aid Training in Schools  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board

May 03, 2018 Thursday 04:27:43 PM IST
When Mathematics ‘UNCOVERS’ New Chemistry

USA: Dr. B. Christopher Rinderspacher, a theoretical chemist with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, predicts that material scientists will be able to use advanced software to “specify the properties they desire and a programme will deliver a choice of optimised chemical compounds”. Rinderspacher has described the process of using mathematics to design chemical compounds by reducing complexity and making use of machine learning. 

The search for chemical compounds with particularly useful properties is an obscure one, he says. In the past, chemists would look for new materials through an established framework and chance upon new combinations in a random hit or miss manner. Rinderspacher now hopes to direct chemists in the right direction using a mathematical approach to develop a general theoretical framework for finding chemical compounds.


Comments