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August 30, 2019 Friday 11:27:15 AM IST

Weight management at home

Parent Interventions

An in-home weight management programme improved the health of not only the child, but also the child's parents, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour.

Obese children are four times more likely to become obese adults making childhood obesity a significant health threat. A new study in the journal found the Developing Relationships that Include Values of Eating and Exercise (DRIVE) curriculum mitigated weight gain in at-risk children as well as prompting their parents to lose weight.

Parents typically are the most important and influential people in a child's environment. Children in the DRIVE intervention maintained their body weight with a modest reduction in body mass index over the 19 weeks of the study, Parents who participated in the DRIVE sessions also decreased their body weight. It points to the need for long-term, family-based programmes to support behaviour change.


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