Parent Interventions: How can we Revert Peanut Allergies in Children?  |  Teacher Insights: Play Based Learning has a Positive Impact on Child's Learning and Development  |  Health Monitor: Social Media Use Likely to Affect the Physical Health of a Person  |  Parent Interventions: How to Deal with Developmental Language Disorder in Children  |  Health Monitor: Lifestyle Interventions from Early Childhood Prevents Cardiovascular Diseases  |  Teacher Insights: Teacher Expectations Can Have Powerful Impact on Students Academic Achievement  |  Policy Indications: Make Sure the Digital Technology Works for Public Good  |  Teacher Insights: The Significance of Social Emotional Learning Curriculum in Schools  |  Health Monitor: Forgetting is a Form of Learning  |  Higher Studies: University of Manchester Invites Application for LLB and LLM Programmes   |  Health Monitor: Is There a Blue Spot Inside our Brain?  |  Parent Interventions: Babies born during the Pandemic Performs Lower during Developmental Screening  |  Policy Indications: Invest in Structural Steel R&D : Prof BS Murty  |  Management lessons: ONPASSIVE Technologies Shows the Way in Rewarding Outperformers  |  Parent Interventions: Can We Make Our Kids Smarter?  |  
September 13, 2019 Friday 12:44:09 PM IST

Way to Reduce Hallway Disruptions

Parent Interventions

A game like intervention developed by school psychology researchers in University of Tennessee College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences may help reduce hallway disruptions among elementary school children.

The intervention rewards classes of students for quickly transitioning from one room or activity to another. When implemented with three classes of students from grades one through six at a summer school programme, disruptions during class transitions were reduced by up to 74 percent.

Hallways are daunting spaces for teachers, according to the study, which was published in the Journal of Positive Behaviour Interventions. Being quick in transitions helps significantly reduce inappropriate behaviour.


In the study, students were timed for one class transition a day (for example, from the gym to an academic classroom). A goal time was selected before the class and explained to the children.If the class met the goal time,they were rewarded at the end of the transition.

Comments