National Edu News: CBSE Awards for Teaching and School Leadership 2020-21, Apply till June 28th  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft Surface Laptop 4 for Commercial and Education Purposes  |  Technology Inceptions: 'Sunwatch' to Detect Harmful UV Rays  |  Science Innovations: High Power Laster to Deflect Lightning  |  Parent Interventions: A Guide to Parenting in Times of Pandemic  |  Guest Column: The Death of the Creative Writer!  |  Teacher Insights: Why the Boom in Private Tuition Business?  |  Technology Inceptions: More Heat Resilient Silver Circuitry  |  Science Innovations: Silica Nanoparticles for Precise Drug Targetting  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad Improves in QS World University Rankings to 591-600  |  Technology Inceptions: C02 Emissions to Be Made into Animal Feed  |  Leadership Instincts: Blockchain Helping UN Interventions to End Poverty and Hunger  |  National Edu News: Three Indian Institutions in Top 200 of QS World University Rankings  |  Management lessons: Vaccines, Social Distancing, Facemasks Essential Tools to Fight Covid-19  |  Education Information: “The Language Network” to revolutionise language learning  |  
May 15, 2019 Wednesday 02:06:43 PM IST

Way to curb greenhouse gas

Science Innovations

New research from the University of East Anglia reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide (N2O), also called laughing gas. Some soil bacteria can 'breathe' N2O in environments where oxygen (O2) is limited. This ability is entirely dependent on an enzyme, produced by the bacteria, called 'nitrous oxide reductase', which is the only enzyme known to destroy N2O.  N2O has around 300 times the global warming potential of CO2 and stays in the atmosphere for about 120 years, where it accounts for around nine per cent of total greenhouse gas. It also destroys the ozone layer with similar potency to the now banned chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Atmospheric levels of N2O are rising year on year as microorganisms break down heavily used synthetic nitrogen fertilisers added to agricultural soil. The findings have been published in the journal Chemical Science.

Comments