Technology Inceptions: How to Reduce Heat Generated in Artificial Retina?  |  Science Innovations: How Uncertainty in Findings Impact Credibility of Climate Scientists  |  Teacher Insights: How Children Learn and Decide What to Teach  |  Health Monitor: New Solution to Reduce Tissue Damage in Heart Attack Developed  |  Education Information: AIIMS Bhubaneswar Got Second in Kayakalp Award for Second Year in a Row  |  Education Information: India gets maximum foreign students from Nepal, Karnataka for higher edu: HRD  |  Science Innovations: Caltech Scientists Discover Worms with Three Sexes  |  Education Information: Degree College Teachers Training Programme from 22nd Nov to 12th Dec 2019  |  Career News: ANNOUNCEMENT FOR THE POST OF JOINT DIRECTOR, (NCERT)  |  National Edu News: UGC guidelines on plastic use  |  International Edu News: Asian students converge on 5 countries  |  Health Monitor: Playing With Fire  |  Finance: Trading in an Uncertain World   |  Technology Inceptions: Scientists are Wearing VR Goggles to Analyse Data  |  International Edu News: Macquarie University's Biofoundry to Set Up Synthetic Biology Center  |  
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 09:52:35 AM IST

Way to boost drug potency

Science Innovations

As bacteria continue to demonstrate powerful resilience to antibiotic treatments - posing a rising public health crisis involving a variety of infections - scientists continue to seek a better understanding of bacterial defences against antibiotics in an effort to develop new treatments.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to survive antibiotics. When under attack by antibiotics, bacteria were found to modulate magnesium ion uptake in order to stabilize their ribosomes - the fundamental molecular machines of life that translate genes into proteins - as a survival technique. The researchers concluded that by manipulating the ability of bacteria to take up magnesium (bacteria use charged magnesium ions in defence against antibiotics), scientists may be able to boost the potency of existing antibiotic drugs rather than having to develop completely new drugs. 


Comments