Career News: IIT Hyderabad Campus Placements- 466 Offers in Phase I  |  Parent Interventions: Does the Child Follow their Parents Educational Trajectory?  |  Career News: OIST Seeks Entrepreneurs from the World  |  Teacher Insights: Inverse Designed Photonics: New and Better!  |  Parent Interventions: Can Childhood Obesity be Tracked Digitally?  |  Science Innovations: A Boiling Planet is discovered by NASA’s TESS   |  Teacher Insights: Social Interaction is a kind of Natural Motivation  |  Parent Interventions: Take a Deep Breath! Treating Anxiety in Kids  |  Policy Indications: Parenting Programmes to Prevent Abuse and Neglect in Children  |  Technology Inceptions: Entangled Relations can be now Understood by Artificial Intelligence!  |  Science Innovations: Exposure to Deep Red Light improves Eyesight  |  Health Monitor: Another Mutated Variant of Covid-19 is on its Way!  |  Policy Indications: Survey Finds that Digital Workspace becomes Top Tech Priority in Education  |  Technology Inceptions: Strong Soft Materials are on the Move!  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Learning Through Games-Art and Science of Serious Games  |  
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 09:52:35 AM IST

Way to boost drug potency

Science Innovations

As bacteria continue to demonstrate powerful resilience to antibiotic treatments - posing a rising public health crisis involving a variety of infections - scientists continue to seek a better understanding of bacterial defences against antibiotics in an effort to develop new treatments.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to survive antibiotics. When under attack by antibiotics, bacteria were found to modulate magnesium ion uptake in order to stabilize their ribosomes - the fundamental molecular machines of life that translate genes into proteins - as a survival technique. The researchers concluded that by manipulating the ability of bacteria to take up magnesium (bacteria use charged magnesium ions in defence against antibiotics), scientists may be able to boost the potency of existing antibiotic drugs rather than having to develop completely new drugs. 


Comments