Parent Interventions: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#4 - Are You Eating the Right Food to Fight Covid-19?  |  Science Innovations: Three-Ply Masks Effective Against Covid-19: Texas Tech University  |  Science Innovations: Natural Rainbow Colours Produced  |  Technology Inceptions: Muscope, World’s Smallest Microscope  |  Science Innovations: Ultrasensitive Tactile Sensors for Robots  |  Policy Indications: How Materials Science Helps Contain Contain Covid-19 Spread  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad and PharmCADD signed a pact for the co-development of new drugs   |  Teacher Insights: Be Game  |  Health Monitor: Understanding ‘Haemorrhage'  |  National Edu News: Pallikkutam GlobalConnect#3 on 'Innovative Tools for Effective Teaching'  |  Expert Counsel: The Nine Dash Line  |  National Edu News: Astronomers Find One Group of Appearing and Disappearing Stars  |  Teacher Insights: Bird Book for Children to Love Nature  |  International Edu News: New Model to Fight Social Media Deep Fakes  |  Teacher Insights: Universal Lunch Makes Students Healthier  |  
August 13, 2019 Tuesday 02:45:57 PM IST

Way to boost children’s problem-solving skills

Parent Interventions

Reminding children of their many identities can lead to better problem-solving and more flexible thinking. A typical child plays many roles, such as friend, neighbour, son or daughter. Simply reminding children of that fact can lead to better problem-solving and more flexible thinking, finds new research from Duke University.

Reminding kids about their multi-faceted selvesboost their problem-solving skills.by means of a simple mindset switch. For instance, when shown pictures of a bear gazing at a honey-filled beehive high up in a tree, the children had more creative ideas as to how the bear might get the honey, such as flipping over a bowl so that it becomes a stool. In other words, they saw a new use for the bowl.The research appears in the journal Developmental Science. As the results suggest simple ways to promote flexible, inclusive thinking for the young, they could be especially valuable for teachers, according to the researchers. 

Comments