Technology Inceptions: Can Machines understand facts just as Human beings?  |  Parent Interventions: Busting the Vaccination Myths  |  Career News: IIT Hyderabad Campus Placements- 466 Offers in Phase I  |  Parent Interventions: Does the Child Follow their Parents Educational Trajectory?  |  Career News: OIST Seeks Entrepreneurs from the World  |  Teacher Insights: Inverse Designed Photonics: New and Better!  |  Parent Interventions: Can Childhood Obesity be Tracked Digitally?  |  Science Innovations: A Boiling Planet is discovered by NASA’s TESS   |  Teacher Insights: Social Interaction is a kind of Natural Motivation  |  Parent Interventions: Take a Deep Breath! Treating Anxiety in Kids  |  Policy Indications: Parenting Programmes to Prevent Abuse and Neglect in Children  |  Technology Inceptions: Entangled Relations can be now Understood by Artificial Intelligence!  |  Science Innovations: Exposure to Deep Red Light improves Eyesight  |  Health Monitor: Another Mutated Variant of Covid-19 is on its Way!  |  Policy Indications: Survey Finds that Digital Workspace becomes Top Tech Priority in Education  |  
August 13, 2019 Tuesday 02:45:57 PM IST

Way to boost children’s problem-solving skills

Parent Interventions

Reminding children of their many identities can lead to better problem-solving and more flexible thinking. A typical child plays many roles, such as friend, neighbour, son or daughter. Simply reminding children of that fact can lead to better problem-solving and more flexible thinking, finds new research from Duke University.

Reminding kids about their multi-faceted selvesboost their problem-solving skills.by means of a simple mindset switch. For instance, when shown pictures of a bear gazing at a honey-filled beehive high up in a tree, the children had more creative ideas as to how the bear might get the honey, such as flipping over a bowl so that it becomes a stool. In other words, they saw a new use for the bowl.The research appears in the journal Developmental Science. As the results suggest simple ways to promote flexible, inclusive thinking for the young, they could be especially valuable for teachers, according to the researchers. 

Comments