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November 15, 2019 Friday 11:39:09 AM IST

Violence breeds ill-health

Teacher Insights

Exposure to violence can negatively impact a person's physical and psychosocial health, according to two new study initiated by University of Chicago Medicine.

The studies were based on in-person surveys of more than 500 adults living in Chicago neighbourhoods with high rates of violent crime, and in predominantly racial and ethnic minority groups. The results were published recently in journal Health Affairs.


The data showed that the more violence a person experienced in their own community, the lonelier they were likely to be. The highest loneliness was found among people who were exposed to community violence and screened positive for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Exposure to community violence resulted in a 5.5% increase in the hypervigilance score, while exposure to police violence was associated with a 9.8% increase. The findings suggest a complex association between police violence and the mental and physical health.


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