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March 13, 2019 Wednesday 02:41:02 PM IST

US situation causing MBA slump

International Edu News

Almost a third of business schools across the US have identified the domestic political climate as the top reason behind the recent slump in applications, while 74% have said they are concerned it will impact international student enrolment in the years to come, a new Kaplan Test Prep survey has revealed.

According to the survey of admissions officers at more than 150 business schools in the US, 31% ascribed the significant drop in applicants to political climate concerns. Business schools are facing significant headwinds, largely out of their control, the survey said. Some 30% of those surveyed said it’s because the strong job market is keeping prospective students in the workforce, while another 17% said it’s due to the cost of an MBA education. Lingering questions about the value of the degree (13%), a lack of one-year MBA programs (7%) and a perception that fewer jobs require an MBA than in years past (3%) were among the reasons.

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