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November 23, 2020 Monday 11:18:25 AM IST

Tweets Predict Student Outcomes

Teacher Insights

The tweets posted by students can be used to create a prediction model of academic outcomes, according to a study done by researchers at Laboratory of Computational Social Sciences at the Institute of Education of HSE University. The prediction model uses a mathematical textual analysis that registers users’ vocabulary (its range and the semantic fields from which concepts are taken), characters and symbols, post length and world length. An abundance of emojis, words or whole phrases written in capital letters, and vocabulary related to horoscopes, driving, and military service indicate lower grades in school whereas scientific and cultural topics, English words, words and posts longer in length are indicative of good academic performance.

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