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February 13, 2020 Thursday 12:55:09 PM IST

Three University of Chicago scientists named 2020 Sloan Fellows

Teacher Insights

Three University of Chicago scientists have earned prestigious Sloan Research Fellowships, which recognize early-career scientists’ potential to make substantial contributions to their fields. This year’s UChicago winners include a computer scientist who studies the ecology of microbes, a chemist who creatives innovative tools to address human disease and a mathematician who helped prove the long-standing Zimmer conjecture.

Awarded since 1955 to the brightest young scientists across the United States and Canada, the two-year fellowships are one of the most competitive and prestigious awards available to early career researchers. This year’s 126 winners, announced Feb. 12, will receive two-year fellowships in the amount of $75,000 to further their innovative research.

The winners are A. Murat Eren (Meren), an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine; Raymond Moellering, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry; Sebastian Hurtado-Salazar, an assistant professor of mathematics. 

(Content Courtesy: Official Website of the University of Chicago)


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