Leadership Instincts: Online education for tribals  |  Teacher Insights: Online STEM Learning Effective  |  Teacher Insights: Tool Converts Maths into Pictures  |  Teacher Insights: Class Groupings Affect Self Confidence  |  Teacher Insights: Social Media as Learning Tool  |  Teacher Insights: Creativity is Motivation  |  Parent Interventions: 'Morning sickness' is misleading and inaccurate  |  Parent Interventions: Infant sleep problems can signal mental disorders in adolescents  |  Parent Interventions: Children's National Hospital's quality initiative changes at NICU  |  Parent Interventions: Child Feeding Guide helps mums   |  Leadership Instincts: Successful implementation of Digital India Programme  |  Education Information: UPSC Civil Services (Preliminary) 2020 Examination Notification  |  Policy Indications: ‘Accelerate Vigyan’ to strengthen scientific research mechanism  |  International Edu News: The University of Glasgow gets a £1m award from the Wolfson Foundation  |  Policy Indications: University of Glasgow signed an agreement with Rakuten Mobile  |  
October 23, 2017 Monday 04:31:58 PM IST

This technology may speed up home Internet

Technology Inceptions

New York: A new technology promises to speed up slow Internet at home, say researchers, adding that the new hardware can enable speed up to 10,000 megabits-per-second (Mbps) or 10 gigabits-per-second (Gbps).

For a super-fast yet low-cost broadband connection at home in Britain, the new receiver technology can enable dedicated data rates at more than 10,000 Mbps from the current 36 Mbps, noted researchers from the University College London.

"Although 300 Mb/s may be available to some, average UK speeds are currently 36 Mb/s. By 2025, average speeds over 100 times faster will be required to meet increased demands for bandwidth-hungry applications such as ultra-high definition video, online gaming and the Internet of Things (IoT)," explained lead researcher Sezer Erkilinc.

"The future growth in the number of mobile devices, coupled with the promise of 5G to enable new services via smart devices, means we are likely to experience bandwidth restrictions; our new optical receiver technology will help combat this problem," he added in a paper published in the journal Nature Communications.


The receiver is used in optical access networks - the links connecting Internet subscribers to their service providers. The new receiver retains many of the advantages of coherent receivers but is simpler, cheaper and smaller - requiring just a quarter of the detectors used in conventional receivers.

implification was achieved by adopting a coding technique to fibre access networks that was originally designed to prevent signal fading in wireless communications. This approach has the additional cost-saving benefit of using the same optical fibre for both upstream and downstream data.

"This simple receiver offers users a dedicated wavelength, so user speeds stay constant no matter how many users are online at once. It can co-exist with the current network infrastructure," said Erkilinc.

The receiver was tested on a dark fibre network installed between Telehouse (east London), UCL (central London) and Powergate (west London). The team successfully sent data over 37.6 km and 108 km to eight users who were able to download or upload at a speed of at least 10 Gbps.


Comments