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September 06, 2017 Wednesday 10:04:03 AM IST

Think Twice, Babies Are Not What They Seem!

Parent Interventions

Babies are bright! They are intuitive, observant and watchful. They get tuned to the consistent behavior of those who nurture them and are experts at predicting their next move. Despite the fact that they cannot articulate, they keep accurate track of what’s going on in front of them. They also look for patterns of activity indicative of their preferences. Researchers found consistency in baby preferences. For example, if a person repeats the same action three or four times, babies tend to believe that’s their special choice. The study by experts at the Cognition & Development Lab at Washington University in St. Louis, say this research may shed more light on how babies come to know of a person’s preference for a certain type of food, clothing or even a fancy item.

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