Life Inspirations: Sushila Sable-From Waste Picker to Ambassador of Climate Change  |  Science Innovations: Killing drug-resistant bacteria  |  Technology Inceptions: Canon EOS 200D II DSLR With Dual Pixel AF  |  Teacher Insights: Exercise activates memory neural networks   |  Management lessons: BPCL Allows Women Chemical Engineers in Night Shift  |  Health Monitor: Increase in Global Alcoholism Raises Global Disease Burden  |  Parent Interventions: Obesity in Pre-Pregnancy Stage Can Affect Quality of Breast Milk  |  Higher Studies: Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology UG Admissions  |  Technology Inceptions: Now Drones to Deliver Food   |  Technology Inceptions: India to Establish One lakh Digital Villages: Ravi Shankar Prasad  |  Best Practices: FSSAI to Impose Curbs on Promoting Unhealthy Products in School Premises  |  Management lessons: E-Services Most Important in Design of Smart Tourism Organisation  |  Rajagiri Round Table: 'Draft New Educational Policy Comprehensive, Hurdles Likely in Implementation'  |  International Edu News: Estonian schools promote English  |  Technology Inceptions: Microsoft AI Helps Leading Naukrigulf.com Attract More Jobseekers, Employers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

March 07, 2018 Wednesday 10:26:34 AM IST

THE REINVENTION OF THE INDUCTOR

Technology Inceptions

One of the most basic building blocks of modern technology, inductors are omnipresent: cellphones, laptops, radios, televisions, cars. But what is most surprising is that it is essentially the same today as in 1831 when it was first invented by English scientist Michael Faraday. The large size of inductors made based on Faraday’s design of course limits the capacity to build a miniaturised device that should help in fulling exploiting the potential of the Internet of Things, which, by 2020, hopes to connect people to some 50 billion objects. By 2025, this ambition is expected to have an estimated economic impact between $2.7-$6.2 trillion annually. A team at UC Santa Barbara, led by Kaustav Banerjee, a Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has adopted a materials-based approach to reinventing this fundamental element of modern electronics. All inductors generate both magnetic and kinetic inductance, but in the regular metal conductors, kinetic inductance is too tiny to be noticeable. Unlike magnetic inductance, kinetic inductance is not dependent on the inductor’s surface area and in fact resists current fluctuations that alter the velocity of the electrons.

Comments