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May 07, 2018 Monday 03:03:06 PM IST

The 'Myth' of Multitasking

Parent Interventions

Have teenagers really developed such skills of multi-tasking that they can respond to Snapchat, WhatsApp and Instagram, answer texts, and watch funny videos of pets on YouTube, at the same time as studying?

Tom Bennett, a teacher, parent and the UK government's adviser on behaviour in school, says it's a complete "myth" that teenagers can multi-task between social media and online entertainment and still keep studying.

Bennett is the director and founder of the ResearchEd group, which spreads education research among the teaching profession, and he says all the evidence points to online distractions harming learning.

A study of pupils in the Boston area, carried out by a research team including academics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, found "a link between greater media multi-tasking and worse academic outcomes in adolescents"


Though researchers say that taking away the smart phones from the scenario helps, parents should be very careful in implementing that. Complete banning at once will bring negative reaction only.  Though Social media is a good platform where the children can discuss and revise their topics, the brim line between the 'Casual' chat and academic discussion is too thin, which may tempt the teenagers to deviate from their actual goal.

'Smart phone diet' is the healthy way to handle this, say the experts. Parents should openly discuss with the children regarding this and should come to a mutual agreement regarding the time they use phone during their studies. The ideal dieting will help the students to stay on track.

(Source: BBC.COM)



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