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April 20, 2022 Wednesday 12:43:03 PM IST

The Diseases Which Attack The Language Area In Brain

Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA)  is a disease that slowly causes progressive impairment of language in the left hemisphere of the human brain. In a study conducted by Northwestern University, they discovered five different diseases which caused PPA. 

These diseases hit the area responsible for grammar, word comprehension, and progress at a different rate. The initial symptoms of PPA can be subtle and sometimes attributed to anxiety or throat problems. Even specialists may fail to make a diagnosis in a timely manner. In 40% of cases of PPA, the underlying disease is a very unusual form of Alzheimer's disease. It’s unusual because it impairs language rather than memory, and because it can start much earlier when the person is under 65 years old. 

If Alzheimer’s disease is the cause, a patient can be treated with medication and channeled into clinical trials. At the symptom level, an individual who has difficulty with grammar and word-finding can receive targeted speech therapy. People with word comprehension would receive a different type of speech therapy or, perhaps, transcranial magnetic stimulation, which seems to work best for this particular deficit. Anxiety around word finding can be treated with anti-anxiety medication and behavioral therapy.



 

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