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September 13, 2018 Thursday 05:35:46 PM IST

The biological and social aspects of fatherhood

Parent Interventions

There are biological fathers and non-biological fathers. Non-biological fathers include step-fathers, and adopted and foster fathers.

Studies show that there are four types of fathers while considering their paternal involvement in childcare:  1). Motivated Bio-father 2). Unmotivated Bio-father 3). Motivated Non-bio-father and 4). Unmotivated Non-bio-father.  

In researches on fathering, motivated fathers means biological and non bological fathers who are also committed to social relationships with their children. Unmotivated biological fathers refer to disengaged fathers. It is a cultural myth that biological fathers provide care naturally to their children. There are also unmotivated non-biofathers: men who have relationships with mothers, but engage in little childcare. Some men in this group have been identifi ed as potential sources of risk to children and their numbers appear to be growing   

Factors affecting paternal involvement in chilcare


There are eight factors identified to influence paternal involvement with their children: Biological, Motivation, Cultural, Economic, Historical, Legal, Social policy and Relationship with mother.

The nature and quality of father-child involvement has deep rooted impacts and affect individuals and families differently at different points in time.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             (Indebted to various sources)

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