Technology Inceptions: Powerful Robots Helps in Faster Detection of Bridge Defects  |  Teacher Insights: Are you susceptible to persuasion?   |  Science Innovations: Mushrooms to help fight TB  |  Management lessons: How to Create Cool Brands and Stay Cool  |  Health Monitor: Honey Helps Increase Testosterone Levels in Males  |  Parent Interventions: Women Oncologists Skip Scientific Conference to Take Care of Children  |  Career News: Chinmaya University-CPPR Announce MA in Public Policy and Governance Course  |  Parent Interventions: Electrical zap to retrieve memory  |  Science Innovations: Laura Kreidberg: Trying to Spot the First Sign of Life Outside Earth  |  Parent Interventions: Don't Let Children Drink Too Much Juice, Sugar Water With Little Nutrients  |  Technology Inceptions: Low-Cost Tissue Freezing Device to Help In Breast Cancer Treatment  |  Science Innovations: Exomoons May Become Quasi-planets  |  Science Innovations: Blue Tongue Lizard Babies As Clever as Adults  |  Parent Interventions: Quality Sleep for Teen Health   |  Technology Inceptions: MIT Develops Artificial 'Muscles' Based on Fibers  |  
  • Pallikkutam Magazine
  • Companion Magazine
  • Mentor
  • Smart Board
  • Pallikkutam Publications

September 13, 2018 Thursday 05:35:46 PM IST

The biological and social aspects of fatherhood

Parent Interventions

There are biological fathers and non-biological fathers. Non-biological fathers include step-fathers, and adopted and foster fathers.

Studies show that there are four types of fathers while considering their paternal involvement in childcare:  1). Motivated Bio-father 2). Unmotivated Bio-father 3). Motivated Non-bio-father and 4). Unmotivated Non-bio-father.  

In researches on fathering, motivated fathers means biological and non bological fathers who are also committed to social relationships with their children. Unmotivated biological fathers refer to disengaged fathers. It is a cultural myth that biological fathers provide care naturally to their children. There are also unmotivated non-biofathers: men who have relationships with mothers, but engage in little childcare. Some men in this group have been identifi ed as potential sources of risk to children and their numbers appear to be growing   

Factors affecting paternal involvement in chilcare


There are eight factors identified to influence paternal involvement with their children: Biological, Motivation, Cultural, Economic, Historical, Legal, Social policy and Relationship with mother.

The nature and quality of father-child involvement has deep rooted impacts and affect individuals and families differently at different points in time.  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             (Indebted to various sources)

Comments