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February 06, 2020 Thursday 02:05:50 PM IST

#ThankYourTeacher campaign

Teacher Insights

Monash University is calling on Australians to #ThankYourTeacher, on the back of a new report that reveals nearly three-quarters of teachers feel underappreciated in the classroom and struggle with workload. A new report led by Dr. Amanda Heffernan, Lecturer in Leadership in Monash University’s Faculty of Education, shows 71 percent of Australia’s teachers feel underappreciated in their profession and are burdened by administrative tasks outside classroom hours that take up precious family time.

The report found that a large majority of teachers (76 percent) did not find their current workload manageable. Only 42 teachers – under 2 percent of those surveyed – strongly agreed that they could manage their workload. Despite feeling underappreciated and overworked in their vocation, more than half of teachers (56 percent) said they were satisfied in their role, while 34 percent said they were unhappy. When asked if they intended to leave the profession, 58 percent of teacher participants indicated they would. Of those respondents, 10 percent cited feeling underappreciated as the reason for quitting teaching. These negative sentiments were felt by Australian teachers despite 93 percent of the public saying they trusted teachers to do a good job in the classroom.

The report, titled Perceptions of Teachers and Teaching in Australia, examined the experiences and work satisfaction of 2444 members of the teaching profession – one of the largest studies of teacher perceptions in Australia. More than 1000 members of the public were also interviewed as part of this report.

(Content Courtesy: https://www.monash.edu/news/articles/study-shows-teachers-underappreciated,-overworked-in-classroom)


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