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February 26, 2019 Tuesday 02:30:34 PM IST

Temperature sensors in plants

Science Innovations

A rabidopsis, a winter plant, grows at different times of day as the seasons change. In the summer, the plant grows during the day, but during the winter it grows at night. Researchers at University of California - Riverside examined the role of phytochrome B (temperature sensor) in Arabidopsis at 21 degrees Celsius and 27 degrees Celsius under red light. The monochromatic wavelength allowed the team to study how this particular plant sensor functions without interference from other wavelengths of light. Phytochrome B, a molecular signalling pathway, plays a pivotal role in how plants respond to temperature. Understanding how plants respond to temperature can predict not only future food availability but also develop new technologies to help plants cope with increasing temperature changes associated with global warming.

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