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November 27, 2020 Friday 11:29:55 AM IST

Teaching information literacy

Teacher Insights

A new educational report from Project Information Literacy (PIL) uses the first 100 days of the COVID-19 news story to help educators and high school and college students revisit the early coverage and think critically about how journalism shapes the national narrative and often defines what we see and learn, what we think, and who we are. Information agency is the ability to reclaim some control over the news. It takes pulling back and looking at the “shape of news” to identify critically important themes and pieces of information.

To help students build this skill, the first part of the report presents interactive graphs and a timeline narrative to show the coronavirus story’s development over time. Learning resources include exercises for seeing how news stories develop and managing readers’ attention over time.

Visual literacy is the ability to understand how the composition and presentation of images adds meaning to a news event, while eliciting certain emotional responses. The second part of the report looks at news images in the coronavirus coverage and how lighting, angle, or cropping played a role in visual messaging. Learning resources let students code news images on their own to see firsthand the effect visuals can have on viewers. Within the classroom context, educators can use this study as a reading and teaching resource to nurture civic literacy.


(Content Courtesy: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/newsplus/teaching-information-literacy/)


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