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March 03, 2020 Tuesday 12:03:37 PM IST

Teaching 100 teachers: A seventh grader launches interactive class lessons

Teacher Insights

Namya Joshi, a seventh-grade student of Sat Paul Mittal School in Ludhiana, India, has been helping teachers of her school convert their class lessons into interactive Minecraft sessions. It all started two years ago when her mother, who is the IT Head at the school, signed up to become a global Minecraft mentor, as a part of the Microsoft Innovative Educator programme.

A Microsoft Expert Educator herself, Joshi thought she’d learn how to use Minecraft on her own gradually. But one day she found Namya playing with Minecraft: Education Edition, a special edition of the game customized for the classroom environment, on her laptop. Joshi asked her daughter to create her upcoming lesson in the Minecraft world. It was a creative writing lesson and Namya had to write about her recent trip to the hills. The result convinced Joshi about using Minecraft in her school. Joshi asked her daughter to create her upcoming lesson in the Minecraft world. It was a creative writing lesson and Namya had to write about her recent trip to the hills. The result convinced Joshi about using Minecraft in her school.

She discussed the possibility of building Minecraft into the curriculum with the school’s principal. With the principal’s encouragement, the mother-daughter duo started creating more lessons on Minecraft and soon other students and teachers in the school joined them.

So far, Namya has trained more than 100 teachers in her school and around the world, over teams, on the use of Microsoft tools such as Minecraft, Scratch, Kahoot, and Flipgrid in their classrooms. Her first-hand experience of the effectiveness of these tools for learning has led her to become a strong advocate of gamification in education. She regularly collaborates with educators and learners from across the world through Microsoft Teams. The seventh-grader extraordinaire has her own blog and has recently launched a YouTube channel as well.



(Content and Image Source: A Feature by Rajat Agrawal. https://news.microsoft.com/en-in/features/teenager-teaching-100-teachers-minecraft/)


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