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July 02, 2019 Tuesday 04:56:46 PM IST

Teachers Need to Be More Engaging To Keep Students off YouTube

Teacher Insights

Instructors need to be engaging or entertaining to keep students off Youtube while in class according to a study done by University of Waterloo.
The researchers surveyed 478 undergraduates and 36 instructors on their perception of technology use in class. Many students felt they felt bored and not engaged in the classroom. YouTube was a distraction for most students and was a hindrance for teachers.
However, majority of the students felt that banning of technology was not the answer to use of YouTube in classroom. The instructors need to keep students more engaged and entertained to keep them away from YouTube. The study authored by Elena Neiterman and Christine Zaza was titled "A Mixed Blessing? Students' and Instructors' Perspectives about Off-task Technology Use in the Academic Classroom.



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