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April 26, 2018 Thursday 03:46:09 PM IST
Teach Them these 8 Things!

Studies prove that the kids of the parents who imbibe in them the qualities of a good leader in early childhood, is likely to be a successful leader. Here are certain basic characteristics which the child can learn from the parents.

1. Teach them to start with small "wins":

Research shows that gaining agreement has an enduring effect, even if only over the short term. So teach your kids to focus not on jumping right to the end of their arguments but to start with statements or premises they know their audience will agree with. Build a foundation for further agreement.

2. Teach them not to be afraid to take strong stands:

Research shows humans prefer cockiness to expertise. We naturally assume confidence equates with skill.

Even the most skeptical people tend to be at least partly persuaded by a confident speaker. People prefer advice from a confident source. So teach your kids to be bold. Teach them to stop saying "I think" or "I believe." Teach them to stop adding qualifiers to their speech. Tell them, "If you think something will work, just say it will work. If you believe something will work, just say it will work."

3. Teach them to adjust their rate of speech:

There's reason behind the "fast-talking salesman" stereotype: In certain situations, talking fast works. 

'If your audience is likely to disagree, speak faster; if your audience is likely to agree, speak slower' is the key. When your audience is inclined to disagree with you, speaking faster gives them less time to form their own counterarguments, giving you a better chance of persuading them.

When your audience is inclined to agree with you, speaking slowly gives them time to evaluate your arguments and factor in a few of their own thoughts. The combination of your reasoning plus their initial bias means they are more likely to, at least in part, persuade themselves.

4. Teach them to know how their audience prefers to process information:

Teach your kids not to push for instant agreement if someone's personality style makes that unlikely. And teach them not to ask for thought and reflection if their audience loves to make quick decisions and move on.

5. Teach them not to be afraid to be "unprofessional.":

Teach your kids to be themselves. Authenticity is always more persuasive. If they feel strongly enough to slip in a mild curse word, they should feel free (in the right setting, of course.) Research shows they're likely to be a little more persuasive.

6. Teach them to focus on describing positive outcomes:

While it's tempting to use scare tactics, positive-outcome statements tend to be more persuasive. So if your kids are trying to create a change, tell them to focus on sharing the positives of that change. They want to take their audience to a better place, not tell their audience what to avoid.

7. Teach them to share the good and the bad:

Sometimes, sharing an opposing viewpoint or two is more persuasive than sticking solely to your argument.

Why? Very few ideas or proposals are perfect. Your audience knows that. They know there are other perspectives and potential outcomes.

So teach your kids to meet objections head on. Tell them to talk about the things their audience may already be considering. Teach them to discuss potential negatives and show how they will mitigate or overcome those problems.

Teach your kids to talk about the other side of the argument - and then do their best to show why they're still right.

8. Most of all, teach your kids not to just say they're right. Teach them to be right:

Teach your kids to be clear, concise, and to the point. Teach them to win the day because their data, reasoning, and conclusions are beyond reproach.

What's true for your kids applies to all of us: The art of persuasion should simply be the icing on an undeniably logical cake.

(Source:www.inc.com)


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