Education Information: Not Sure of Reliability of News? Get It Verified at Covid19 Fact Check Unit  |  Science Innovations: Covid-19: DST funded startup develops chemical free silver based disinfectant   |  Technology Inceptions: A cost-effective virucidal coating of surgical masks from IIT Kanpur  |  Leadership Instincts: CSIR-IMTECH takes up sample testing for Covid-19  |  Creative Living: Music Industry Turns to Social Media To Bring Solace in Times of Pandemic  |  National Edu News: Hack the Crisis, Online Hackathon for Covid 19 Solutions  |  National Edu News: HRD Minister launches MHRD AICTE COVID-19 Student Helpline Portal   |  Science Innovations: University of Pittsburgh Covid-19 Vaccine Undergoes Animal Trials Successfully  |  Teacher Insights: UNICEF launches #ReadtheWorld initiative for children   |  Science Innovations: Covid-19 -Tracing the Route Map of the Clever Spiky Protein  |  Teacher Insights: Dr Christine Yao announced as BBC New Generation Thinker  |  International Edu News: New research on COVID-19's impact on youth mental health   |  Teacher Insights: Cambridge researchers awarded European Research Council funding  |  International Edu News: Oxford University launches world’s first COVID-19 government response tracker  |  Parent Interventions: New treatment for childhood anxiety works by changing parent behaviour  |  
November 08, 2017 Wednesday 03:15:53 PM IST

Taking little stress may be good

Health Monitor

New York: Worried that being in stressful situations might harm you? Take heart. According to a study, taking a little stress can be good for your cells as it boosts resilience, protects ageing cells as well as delays the risk of disease. The findings will help researchers better understand the molecular mechanisms that drive ageing and risk for age-associated degenerative diseases.

"Our findings offer us a strategy for looking at ageing in humans and how we might prevent or stabilise against cell decline as we age," said Richard I. Morimoto, Professor at the Northwestern University. 

"Our goal is not trying to find ways to make people live longer but rather to increase health at the cellular and molecular levels, so that a person's span of good health matches their lifespan," Morimoto added. For the study, published in the journal Cell Reports, the team screened a transparent roundworm C. elegans' approximately 22,000 genes.

The researchers found that signals from mildly stressed mitochondria -- the cellular source of energy -- prevent the failure of protein-folding quality control (proteostasis) machinery that comes with age. 


This, in turn, suppresses the accumulation of damaged proteins that can occur in degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

"People have always known that prolonged mitochondrial stress can be deleterious. But we discovered that when you stress mitochondria just a little, the mitochondrial stress signal is actually interpreted by the cell and animal as a survival strategy," Morimoto said. "It makes the animals completely stress-resistant and doubles their lifespan. It's like magic," he added. 

C.elegans has a biochemical environment and cellular properties similar to that of humans. The findings in the transparent roundworm may have implications for humans and quality of life.


Comments