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April 07, 2021 Wednesday 11:58:01 AM IST

Tackle Childhood Behaviour Issues at Home

Parent Interventions

A home-based parenting programme to prevent childhood behaviour problems can be very effective even in the case of toddlers as young as 12 months. A University of Cambridge designed six-session programme involves carefully prepared feedback to parents about how they can build on positive moments when playing and engaging with their child using video clips of everyday interactions which are filmed by a health professional while visiting their home. It was trialled with 300 families of children who had shown early signs of behaviour problems. Half of the families received the programme alongside routine healthcare support, while the other half received routine support alone. When assessed 5 months later, the children whose families had access to the video-feedback approach displayed significantly reduced behavioural problems compared with those whose families had not.

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