Education Information: Not Sure of Reliability of News? Get It Verified at Covid19 Fact Check Unit  |  Science Innovations: Covid-19: DST funded startup develops chemical free silver based disinfectant   |  Technology Inceptions: A cost-effective virucidal coating of surgical masks from IIT Kanpur  |  Leadership Instincts: CSIR-IMTECH takes up sample testing for Covid-19  |  Creative Living: Music Industry Turns to Social Media To Bring Solace in Times of Pandemic  |  National Edu News: Hack the Crisis, Online Hackathon for Covid 19 Solutions  |  National Edu News: HRD Minister launches MHRD AICTE COVID-19 Student Helpline Portal   |  Science Innovations: University of Pittsburgh Covid-19 Vaccine Undergoes Animal Trials Successfully  |  Teacher Insights: UNICEF launches #ReadtheWorld initiative for children   |  Science Innovations: Covid-19 -Tracing the Route Map of the Clever Spiky Protein  |  Teacher Insights: Dr Christine Yao announced as BBC New Generation Thinker  |  International Edu News: New research on COVID-19's impact on youth mental health   |  Teacher Insights: Cambridge researchers awarded European Research Council funding  |  International Edu News: Oxford University launches world’s first COVID-19 government response tracker  |  Parent Interventions: New treatment for childhood anxiety works by changing parent behaviour  |  
February 13, 2020 Thursday 10:39:46 AM IST

Synchronization of neurons is critical for learning and forming memories

Science Innovations

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the neurons involved in Pavlovian learning shift their behavior during the process and become more synchronized when a memory is being formed.

In the study, recently published in The FASEB Journal, researchers looked at Pavlovian learning patterns, or respondent conditioning, in mice. In the beginning, before any repetitive learning exercises, the mice did not know what to expect and using special imaging with an endomicroscope the researchers saw that the neural activity was disorderly. But after repeating different tasks associated with a conditional stimulus, like a tone or bell, the mice began to recognize the pattern and the highly active neurons become more synchronized. The researchers hypothesize that without forming synchronization, animals cannot form or retrieve this type of memory.

Contributing to these findings are Yuxin Zhou, doctoral candidate; Liyan Qiu, research scientist; both at UNH, and Haiying Wang, assistant professor at the University of Connecticut.

(Content Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200206132341.htm)


Comments