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February 13, 2020 Thursday 10:39:46 AM IST

Synchronization of neurons is critical for learning and forming memories

Science Innovations

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the neurons involved in Pavlovian learning shift their behavior during the process and become more synchronized when a memory is being formed.

In the study, recently published in The FASEB Journal, researchers looked at Pavlovian learning patterns, or respondent conditioning, in mice. In the beginning, before any repetitive learning exercises, the mice did not know what to expect and using special imaging with an endomicroscope the researchers saw that the neural activity was disorderly. But after repeating different tasks associated with a conditional stimulus, like a tone or bell, the mice began to recognize the pattern and the highly active neurons become more synchronized. The researchers hypothesize that without forming synchronization, animals cannot form or retrieve this type of memory.

Contributing to these findings are Yuxin Zhou, doctoral candidate; Liyan Qiu, research scientist; both at UNH, and Haiying Wang, assistant professor at the University of Connecticut.

(Content Source: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200206132341.htm)


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