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October 23, 2019 Wednesday 09:29:58 AM IST

Superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

Science Innovations

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity - the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss.

Also known as a nickelate, it is the first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors that is very similar to the copper oxides, or cuprates,  and promises to revolutionize electronic devices, power transmission and other technologies. Perovskite - a material defined by its unique, double-pyramid atomic structure - that contained neodymium, nickel and oxygen was doped  by adding strontium; this is a common process that adds chemicals to a material to make more of its electrons flow freely.

Further tests revealed that the nickelate was indeed superconducting in a temperature range from 9-15 kelvins - incredibly cold, but a first start, with possibilities of higher temperatures ahead.the discovery could help crack the mystery of how high-temperature superconductors work.


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