International Edu News: Hillary Clinton becomes the Chancellor of Queen’s University Belfast  |  Science Innovations: New learning resources for blind students  |  National Edu News: Cabinet approves RCE of permanent campus of new NITs  |  Policy Indications: MoU between Brazil and India for early childhood gets approval  |  Best Practices: Lets All Help launches Junior Change makers program for the children   |  Leadership Instincts: Autistic graduate wins Cross Future Leaders Award  |  Science Innovations: Why flowers attract mosquitoes   |  Technology Inceptions: Internet addiction may reduce study skills and motivation   |  Parent Interventions: Cleanliness keeps celiac kids safe from gluten   |  Teacher Insights: Improve quality of teaching and research: VP  |  Policy Indications: Democracy Index 2019 released  |  Policy Indications: Learning disabilities could lead children to criminal justice system  |  Parent Interventions: New study seeks to prevent eczema in babies  |  Parent Interventions: When and How to Try: Infants do it their own   |  Parent Interventions: Prenatal smoking and drinking: 12-fold increased risk for SIDS   |  
August 02, 2017 Wednesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Sun's core rotates four times faster

Science Innovations

Washington: An international team of astronomers has found that the Sun's core rotates nearly four times faster than the solar surface. The discovery was possible with European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, which helped the solar scientists find evidence of a type of seismic wave in our Sun. 

These low-frequency waves, called g-modes, revealed that the solar core is rotating some four times faster than the solar surface. "This is certainly the biggest result of SOHO in the last decade, and one of SOHO's all-time top discoveries," said Bernhard Fleck, ESA's SOHO project scientist based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Just like seismologists use the way earthquakes travel through Earth's interior to study our planet's structure, solar physicists use helioseismology to study the Sun's interior structure by tracking the way waves move throughout the star. 


Comments