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August 02, 2017 Wednesday 12:22:49 PM IST

Sun's core rotates four times faster

Science Innovations

Washington: An international team of astronomers has found that the Sun's core rotates nearly four times faster than the solar surface. The discovery was possible with European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, which helped the solar scientists find evidence of a type of seismic wave in our Sun. 

These low-frequency waves, called g-modes, revealed that the solar core is rotating some four times faster than the solar surface. "This is certainly the biggest result of SOHO in the last decade, and one of SOHO's all-time top discoveries," said Bernhard Fleck, ESA's SOHO project scientist based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Just like seismologists use the way earthquakes travel through Earth's interior to study our planet's structure, solar physicists use helioseismology to study the Sun's interior structure by tracking the way waves move throughout the star. 


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