Policy Indications: Safe gaming – new guidelines to support children online  |  Policy Indications: EUniWell selected as a 'European University'  |  Health Monitor: Covid-19 Lockdown May Lead to Cabin Fever  |  Education Information: Students launch lockdown travel guide for UK tourists  |  Leadership Instincts: Professor Nicholas Stern awarded 2020 SIEPR Prize  |  Leadership Instincts: LSE becomes the eighth full member of CIVICA  |  Education Information: Emerging trends in Higher Education examined  |  International Edu News: Delirium, rare brain inflammation and stroke linked to Covid-19  |  International Edu News: Euclid space telescope’s camera a step closer to imaging galaxies  |  International Edu News: Anna Strongman appointed new CEO of Oxford University Development  |  National Edu News: PM dedicates Rewa Ultra Mega Solar Power project to the nation  |  Policy Indications: New Working Norms  |  Leadership Instincts: IIT’s Face Mask Gives a Boost to Textile Industry  |  Leadership Instincts: Imperial College Supplies Backpack Activity Kits  |  Teacher Insights: No Additional Fees for Online Learning  |  
May 28, 2020 Thursday 07:11:01 PM IST

Study links severe childhood deprivation to difficulties in adulthood

Parent Interventions

A team of researchers from the University of Southampton, the University of Bath and King’s College London have provided compelling evidence of the impact of adversity in childhood on neuropsychological functioning in adulthood. They also showed that neuropsychological difficulties may explain why early adversity is linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in later life. Their study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, analysed neuropsychological function in 70 young adults who were exposed to severely depriving conditions in Romanian orphanages during Nicolae Ceausescu's regime and subsequently adopted by British families. The adoptees were compared to 22 British adoptees of similar ages who had not suffered childhood deprivation.

As part of the research, the adoptees were asked to carry out tests to assess their neuropsychological functioning in five areas: controlling their responses (inhibitory control), prospective memory, decision-making, emotional recognition and cognitive ability (IQ). Prospective memory is the ability to remember to do something in the future, such as remembering to go to an appointment or what you need to buy if you don’t have a shopping list. ADHD and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms were assessed through questionnaires completed by their parents.

The results showed that the Romanian adoptees had lower IQs and performed less well on the other four tests when compared to the adoptees who had not suffered deprivation. The adoptees with the lowest IQs and the greatest problems in prospective memory were more likely to show ADHD symptoms in adulthood than those without neuropsychological difficulties.  The researchers found no direct link between ASD symptoms and neuropsychological performance.

The latest research is part of the wider English and Romanian Adoptees study, a collaborative study between the University of Southampton and King’s College London which began shortly after the fall of the communist regime in Romania.


Children living in the institutions were subjected to extremely poor hygiene, insufficient food, little affection and no social or cognitive stimulation. The study analyses the mental health and brain development of 165 children who spent time in Romanian institutions and who were adopted by families in the UK when aged between two weeks and 43 months.



(Content Courtesy: https://www.southampton.ac.uk/news/2020/05/adhd-childhood-deprivation.page)


Comments