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August 21, 2018 Tuesday 11:57:56 AM IST

Students learn social skills better from skilled peers

Teacher Insights

There is a growing tendency to group students with problem together to be able to handle them easily. However, researchers from University of Missouri suggests a better option: allow them to peer with students with similar level of social skills, rather than those with similar social deviations! The results are published in the School Psychology Quarterly.

"One child might have difficulties looking people in the face, while another might have issues staying on topic," Stichter, professor of special education at the MU College of Education, said. "However, if they both are at the level where they can interact and realize they have behaviors that need to be corrected, they can communicate effectively and help each other in a group setting. They essentially learn together."

For example, it might not be ideal to form groups made up solely of children on the autism spectrum. Instead, it could be more beneficial for children's development to group them with others who have similar social abilities but have a wide array of challenges.



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