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December 21, 2018 Friday 01:26:42 PM IST

Stronger Self-Regulation In Childhood to Boost Resilience

Parent Interventions

Research at the University of Pittsburgh and Centre for Translational and Prevention Science at the University of Georgia has revealed that family-focused interventions offer a way of buffering against negative socio-emotional effects. Accordingly, family centred programmes play a role in improving outcomes over a long period of time.

The study incorporated data from brain imaging of two groups. The interventions pertained to skill building in youth, improving parental emotional support, encouraging parent-child communication and helping youth set future goals.

Neuroimaging showed that those who participated in the intervention had stronger connections (more interactions) between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex -- areas involved with memory and decision-making, in comparison with the other group. The intervention group exhibited fewer disruptive behavioural problems, from aggression to losing their temper.

The study suggests that strengthening kids' self-regulation skills and enhancing supportive parenting is a cost-effective way of addressing social disparities and promoting the well-being of at-risk children


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