Guest Column: The Death of the Creative Writer!  |  Teacher Insights: Why the Boom in Private Tuition Business?  |  Technology Inceptions: More Heat Resilient Silver Circuitry  |  Science Innovations: Silica Nanoparticles for Precise Drug Targetting  |  National Edu News: IIT Hyderabad Improves in QS World University Rankings to 591-600  |  Technology Inceptions: C02 Emissions to Be Made into Animal Feed  |  Leadership Instincts: Blockchain Helping UN Interventions to End Poverty and Hunger  |  National Edu News: Three Indian Institutions in Top 200 of QS World University Rankings  |  Management lessons: Vaccines, Social Distancing, Facemasks Essential Tools to Fight Covid-19  |  Education Information: “The Language Network” to revolutionise language learning  |  Guest Column: Noetic Future Shock!  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Appropriate Pedagogy of the Digital Natives  |  Science Innovations: How to Reduce Animal Experimentation in Medicine?  |  National Edu News: Jammu & Kashmir MSMEs enlighten themselves with CSIR-CMERI Advanced Oxygen Tech  |  Teacher Insights: Brain Syncs Hearing with Vision  |  
May 16, 2019 Thursday 11:35:51 AM IST

Stress from 'overthink'

Teacher Insights

Children are more likely to suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if they think their reaction to traumatic events is not 'normal', according to a new research. While most children recover well after a traumatic event, some go on to develop PTSD that may stay with them for months, years, or even into adulthood. 

The study, published by University of East Anglia’s Norwich Medical School, reveals that children begin down this route when they have trouble processing their trauma and perceive their symptoms as being a sign that something is seriously wrong. Symptoms of PTSD can be a common reaction to trauma in children and teenagers. These can include distressing symptoms like intrusive memories, nightmares and flashbacks. The children who don’t recover well are those spending a lot of time trying to make sense of their trauma. It is also possible for such children to get 'stuck' and spend too long focusing on what happened and why. 


Comments