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May 16, 2019 Thursday 11:35:51 AM IST

Stress from 'overthink'

Teacher Insights

Children are more likely to suffer Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) if they think their reaction to traumatic events is not 'normal', according to a new research. While most children recover well after a traumatic event, some go on to develop PTSD that may stay with them for months, years, or even into adulthood. 

The study, published by University of East Anglia’s Norwich Medical School, reveals that children begin down this route when they have trouble processing their trauma and perceive their symptoms as being a sign that something is seriously wrong. Symptoms of PTSD can be a common reaction to trauma in children and teenagers. These can include distressing symptoms like intrusive memories, nightmares and flashbacks. The children who don’t recover well are those spending a lot of time trying to make sense of their trauma. It is also possible for such children to get 'stuck' and spend too long focusing on what happened and why. 


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