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November 16, 2018 Friday 11:28:51 AM IST

Social media could affect self-esteem of women

Parent Interventions

Social media active young women who engage with social media images of friends who they think are more attractive than themselves may feel worse about their own appearance afterward! Results to this effect is published in the journal Body Image by researchers of York University.

"The results showed that these young adult women felt more dissatisfied with their bodies," says Mills, one of the research scholar. "They felt worse about their own appearance after looking at social media pages of someone that they perceived to be more attractive than them. Even if they felt bad about themselves before they came into the study, on average, they still felt worse after completing the task."

Young women generally post something to social media are hoping to get positive reinforcement for what they're posting and the way in which women use social media is more appearance-based than it is for men.

"When we compare ourselves to other people, that has the potential to affect the valuation of ourselves," says Mills. We really need to educate young people on how social media use could be making them feel about themselves and how this could even be linked to stringent dieting, eating disorders or excessive exercise. There are people who may be triggered by social media and who are especially vulnerable."


Source: DOI: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2018.11.002

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