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February 13, 2019 Wednesday 01:38:50 PM IST
Social Media Cannot Cause Depression

A new study long-term study conducted among adolescents in Ontario in Canada reveal that use of social media need not lead to depression.

Two sets of participants were part of the study led by Taylor Heffer of Brock University- 594 adolescents and 1,132 undergraduates. They were observed for their time spent on social media, viewing TV, exercising and completion of homework. They were observed for any signs of depression using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. They did not observe any signs of depresson but adult females suffering from higher depression were likely to turn to social media to feel better.

The study results indicate that parents and policy makers need not panic about excess use of social media by society and effective use of it may help people stay connected and share lots of information.

Source: https://www.psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/no-evidence-that-teens-social-media-use-predicts-depression.html

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