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March 07, 2018 Wednesday 10:25:20 AM IST
SMARTPHONE APP MAY HELP REDUCE HOSPITAL READMISSIONS AFTER HEART ATTACK

A new smartphone app can potentially help reduce hospital readmissions in patients who have been treated for a heart attack, according to a study by the American College of Cardiology’s Cardiovascular Summit in Las Vegas. “We have found there are many gaps in care in patients recovering from a heart attack,” said lead author William Yang, MD, Resident, Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. “We wanted to engage patients in their own care, and help them transition from the hospital to home using existing technology.” The “Corrie” app, made for iPhone, is the first cardiology app for the Apple CareKit platform and is designed to help patients find their way through the hospital discharge process by educating them about heart disease. The app will help them keep track of medications, follow-up appointments, and lifestyle changes they need after a heart attack. A new smartphone app may help reduce the number of hospital readmissions in patients who have been treated for a heart attack, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s Cardiovascular Summit in Las Vegas.

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