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February 17, 2018 Saturday 10:34:57 AM IST

Slow Eating Help Prevent Obesity

Parent Interventions

17th February, 2018: Researchers of Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan has shown that reducing eating speed may be effective in preventing obesity and lowering the associated health risks. The results are published in the journal, BMJ Open, associated to the British Medical Association.

Kyushu University scientists Yumi Hurst and Haruhisa Fukuda based their study on the Japanese men and women enrolled in health insurance societies who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes during the study period. The Body mass index (BMI) of the candidates was measured, and obesity was defined as a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or more.

Researchers investigated into the lifestyle habits of the candidates of research from the responses to questions asked during health check-ups. The lifestyle habits investigated included, eating speed, eating dinner within 2 hours of sleeping, after-dinner snacking, skipping breakfast, alcohol consumption frequency, sleep adequacy and tobacco consumption, etc.

After taking account of potentially influential factors, the results showed that compared with those who tended to gobble up their food, those who ate at a normal speed were 29% less likely to be obese, rising to 42% for those who ate slowly.


Taking snacks after dinner and eating within 2 hours of going to sleep 3 or more times a week were also strongly linked to changes in BMI. But skipping breakfast wasn’t.

These research insights may inspire development of next generation eating styles for keeping health parameters intact.


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