Education Information: Cardiff achieves ‘Champion’ status for gender equality in physics  |  Parent Interventions: Online survey to assess needs of children and young people with cancer   |  Parent Interventions: Study links severe childhood deprivation to difficulties in adulthood  |  Parent Interventions: New study aims to learn the lessons of homeschooling  |  Teacher Insights: Using e-learning to raise biosecurity awareness  |  National Edu News: Science and Technology in finding solutions to combat COVID-19  |  National Edu News: Ek Bharat Shreshtha Bharat programme  |  Health Monitor: Beware of Hepatitis D, It can Lead to Hepatocellular Carcinoma  |  Teacher Insights: Education project to understand Birmingham learning at home during COVID-19  |  Education Information: UoG launches new onlines to meet some of the challenges of Covid-19  |  Teacher Insights: Professor Woolfson awarded Humboldt Research Prize  |  Parent Interventions: Parents paying heavy price for lockdown  |  Teacher Insights: Great Science Share brings science investigations into homes  |  Education Information: App will reduce high risk of falls during and after Lockdown  |  Education Information: University of Manchester to decarbonise its investment portfolio  |  
October 30, 2019 Wednesday 10:26:22 AM IST

Signal blocks stem cell division in brain

Science Innovations

Scientists from University of Basel have investigated the activity of stem cells in the brain of mice and discovered a key mechanism that controls cell proliferation. According to the researchers, the gene regulator Id4 exerts control as to whether stem cells remain in a state of rest or enter cell division. The results were published in Cell Reports and may be relevant for treating neurodegenerative disease in human brains.

The stem cells that have been found to be behind this process are restricted to specialized regions in the brain, so-called niches, which provide key signals that regulate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. With increasing age, however, the stem cells become increasingly inactive and divide less frequently. The study shows that the ‘Notch2’ signalling pathway controls the expression of a specific transcription regulator called Id4.

By manipulating the signalling pathway, the production of new nerve cells can be specifically stimulated.In this way, brain damage caused by degenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases could be repaired in the future.


Comments