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April 22, 2019 Monday 04:27:31 PM IST

Sibling bullying more in large families

Teacher Insights

A child with more than one brother or sister is more likely to be the victim of sibling bullying than those with only one sibling, and firstborn children and older brothers tend to be the perpetrators, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Sibling bullying is a psychological abuse and it is often seen as a normal part of growing up, but it can have long-term consequences such as increased loneliness and mental health problems.Researchers examined the underlying causes of sibling bullying and the possible impact of family structure, parenting behaviours, early social experiences and a child's temperament. A firstborn child will have their resources halved with the birth of a sibling, and even more so as more siblings are added to the family. This causes siblings to fight for those limited resources through dominance.Parents should spend quality time with their firstborns or older children and involve them in caring for younger siblings, the study said.


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